social security

This Will Kill the Economy Long-Term

There are many factors that can help an economy to grow, including productivity gains, wage growth, sound governmental policies, healthy banking systems, etc. A lack of all of these items will hurt economic growth, and there is one more often overlooked item that can and will devastate an economy over the long haul.

It’s probably not what you think, but I’ll give you a hint: think Japan. What is a major issue that is facing Japan? Low birth rates and a disproportionate amount of older persons compared to younger persons. Why does this matter?

Minimum: Statistically, a country needs approximately 2.1 births to have a stable population. If you want to bury yourself in statistics, then you can read reports from the U.N. or The World Bank. Although there are lower mortality rates than in the past, fewer births will mean a declining population and a disproportionate amount of older persons. By the way, the world’s population is expected to stabilize and/or decline by the end of this century.

Disproportion of elderly: In Japan, the population of elderly persons is much higher than in the U.S. Unfortunately, with lower birth rates there are less younger people able to physically take care of the elderly and also financially. Systems like social security will not be able to continue in a healthy fashion if there are not enough younger people available to contribute towards the system.

Basic math: If there are less people available to purchase services and products then economic growth will stagnate or decline. This can be offset somewhat by productivity gains and wage increases to an extent. Also, there will not be enough candidates to fill employment opportunities at businesses, which will stifle growth further.  More people = growing economy.

Myths?: I believe it started back in the 1960’s with doomsday scenarios of overpopulation and a strain on the resources of the planet. It really hasn’t panned out, but there have also been other modern inventions and policies that have stifled population growth. There is one statistic that I’ve heard that states the entire world’s population can fit in the State of Texas comfortably. Even if this statistic is way off and it would take the entire United States, then that would leave the rest of the world wide open.

Solutions: There are a few solutions to address this problem. One is immigration from countries or regions with high birth rates, such as Africa to countries with low birth rates, such as Japan. This would take changes to immigration policies enacted by governments.  The other solution is to encourage families to have more children and not to wait too long to do so. What is the worst that can happen – you may need to buy a massive van to drive your family around?!

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Is it Better if I File Separately from My Spouse and Other Common Tax Questions Answered

We receive a lot of questions pertaining to tax and financial matters. Here is a sample of commonly asked questions:

Q: Is it better if I file separately from my spouse?

A: Usually the answer is no, and the only way to know for certain is to perform an analysis when preparing the tax return to split income and deductions between spouses to see if there is a benefit. However, you may want to file separately from your spouse if there are tax or legal issues.

Q: Is social security taxable?

A: That depends. If you are only receiving social security and do not have other income, then the answer will probably be no. A quick way of checking is to add one half of your social security plus your other income to see if it is greater than your base amount, which varies based upon your filing status (currently it is $32,000 for married filers).

Q: Does my son or daughter need to file a tax return?

A: Generally, if your dependent child has more than $6,300 of earned income or $1,050 of unearned income, such as from dividends, then they need to file a return.

Q: If I file an extension, will it extend the amount of time that I have to pay my taxes.

A: No, the extension only grants you additional time to file your return and all payments must be made by the original due date, otherwise additional interest and penalties may be incurred.

Q: Can the IRS levy my IRA?

A: Yes, the IRS has the power to levy almost all of your income and assets, with few exceptions, such as workers’ compensation.

Q: Are legal fees for a divorce deductible?

A: Many of the legal fees for a divorce are not tax-deductible, except for the portion relating to taxable income.

Don’t Make These Mistakes

With all of the financial and tax laws, changes to the laws, and life changes it is almost impossible to stay on top of everything. We have to constantly assess our situation all of the time. Here are a few things to consider:

Wills, Beneficiaries and Estate Matters: Did you recently get married, have children, or get divorced? If so, then you need to make sure that your will is up to date, along with your beneficiaries of life insurance, retirement, and other financial accounts.

Required Minimum Distributions: Once you turn age 70 ½, you need to start taking distributions from your IRA’s the following year; the first one by April 1st and the next by December 31st. If you don’t do this then you may be subject to a 50% excise tax on the amount that should have been withdrawn.

Retirement Accounts: Are you contributing to your retirement accounts at work or through your business? If not, then what are you waiting for? You may be losing out on employer matches and also tax savings. The simplest way to start is to contribute a small amount, such as 1% of your income and then increase the percentage over time. If you are already contributing to a retirement account, then try to increase your contributions.

Social Security: The biggest mistake with social security is the temptation to start receiving your benefits at age 62. Unless you have known health issues, the biggest risk is actually living too long and receiving a small benefit for the rest of your life. Let us know if you need us to talk you out of this!

No Action: This applies to absolutely everything and not just financial matters. By far, the largest mistake is not taking any action to help your financial situation. Don’t let this happen to you!