Sales

Why is Sales Such a Bad Word?

Everyone is trying to sell something, whether we realize it or not. Even employees are trying to sell themselves to get a job and keep moving up the ladder. Although selling has a bad reputation, it is more about intent, which makes it either good or bad.

The Bad Side of Sales

Selling a service or product that is unnecessary, unhelpful, damaging, or just not needed are the worst forms of selling. The “not needed “ product can be very subjective though, because no one really needs a Dodge Challenger Hellcat, but on the other hand, maybe it is exactly what is needed! On a serious note, a common example of selling something that is unnecessary can be a professional telling you that you need to replace your entire heating system, when it can easily be fully repaired for a fraction of the cost. Another example can be a warranty that is completely useless. The list goes on and every business that sells or provides a service should try to avoid selling in this manner.

The Good Side of Sales

If you are selling something that is in the best interest of your client, customer, or patient, then you are selling correctly. Put their interests before your wallet and you have nothing to worry about. This is the simplest test to alleviate your fears of being a sales person.

Don’t Over Think It

Don’t think about it too much. Everyone is selling something to some degree, whether we recognize it or not.

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Are You Keeping Track of the Right Metrics?

Financial information tends to bore most people except for accountants, accountants, and accountants. Even though the thought of looking through and analyzing numbers may scare you, there are some metrics that drive your financial results and should be measured carefully. They are usually more exciting to keep track of because they can also help predict your results. Here are some examples:

Customer Metrics

Volume: Examples of customer metrics can include: the number of patients, clients, or customers seen/visits per day, week, or month. An increase in this number will increase your sales, however, there may be a delay in actual cash received.

Sales per customer: Are your customers purchasing more or less from you? An easy way to increase sales is to increase the amount of sales to each customer.

Multiple Location Metrics

Same store sales or sales by location: If you have multiple locations, you must keep track of your sales by location. Ideally, you want to keep financials by location, but sales per location is a good starting point. You should compare the sales versus the same period last year and also with other locations.

Net profit by location: It’s great if your sales are doing well in one location, but if the profitability is poor, then you need to know this to make improvements or to shut down that location. Time and resources need to be spent at locations that will achieve the highest return.

Sales or Billings per Employee or by Employee

Sales results: Which employees are performing well, and which are not? What if you operate a real estate office and do not know which agents are your top performers and which are not performing?

Billings: For non-sales positions, especially professional services firms, a crucial number is billings per employee. A low amount may mean that you are over staffed or have inefficient operations. It is also critical to know billings per individual employee.

Leads & Sales Generation

# of leads: Are you receiving more inquiries or less inquiries compared to last month or last year at this time? An increase in leads should result in an increase of sales, but this is just the starting point.

Appointments scheduled: What is the percentage of inquiries that set appointments? You need to make sure that you are able to schedule appointments from your leads.

Appointments closed: A high closing ratio is the ultimate goal and a sign of sales productivity.

Customer acquisition cost: Ideally, you want to obtain customers at the lowest cost possible with the least amount of effort. The longer you retain a customer then the more you can spend trying to acquire them, but if you spend too much money on obtaining one-time customers then your profitability will suffer greatly.

The Metrics are Endless

There is an endless amount of metrics, and each industry has their own set of metrics that are measured, but sometimes metrics can be borrowed from outside your industry to make your own business more profitable. Review your situation to see which metrics will have the most impact to keep your success moving forward.

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How to Destroy Your Business Success in 6 Steps

Sometimes to be successful means to avoid doing the things that will destroy your success. It’s easy to go down the wrong path and it’s important to be aware of this.

Step #1: Saddling Your Business with Debt

Conventional wisdom states that there is smart debt vs. dumb debt or a similar description of two kinds of debt. Although there is some truth to this, the bottom line is that large amounts of debt will cause a huge handicap to your business, especially a start-up. Even if you are doing well it will not feel like it when you have massive debt payments each month or sometimes on a daily or weekly basis if you took out a predatory lender loan. When you have easy access to large amounts of debt it numbs your sense of being financially cautious, prudence, and allows you to spend your money on things that can easily be justified but are not necessary.

Step #2: Poor People Management

See what happens if you constantly treat your employees, vendors, and customers disrespectfully. The end result will be high turnover, sabotage, lack of a sense of shared purpose, losing customers, and everything else negative. It is amazing to see how little attention is paid to the management of people in a poor performing business.

Step #3: Over Working Yourself

There are times when you need to work more or work more rigorously, but if done for too long, then your productivity will decline, decision making becomes worse, and you may find yourself in the hospital for stress induced health reasons.

Step #4: Not Listening to the Right Advisors

Unemployed Uncle Jimmy with a string of failed businesses will not provide you with the advice you need, and if he does provide you with advice, then do the opposite. Or, which is also very commonplace, is to seek the advice of the wrong professional. Make sure the professional that you confide in is an expert with the advice you are looking for.

Step #5: Personal Issues

This is somewhat related to step #2, but more on a personal level. If you are going through difficult times on a personal level, then this will ultimately translate into poor business performance.  A common example is taking care of a sick family member that needs you. If you need to focus more fully on your family situation, then delay starting a business, or for an existing business try to delegate more of your business responsibilities to trusted employees.

Step #6: Ignore Marketing and Sales

Many years ago, I met with a brand new business owner to discuss his business and try to help him out. During our discussion, I asked what he was doing for marketing, and he said that he did very little because he didn’t want to spend money on marketing because marketing costs money. I’m not sure of my exact reply, but he was no longer in business within a few months’ time.

Summing it Up

Some of these steps may seem obvious, but they are common due to the fact that it is hard to take a step back, access a situation, swallow your pride, and say to yourself, “Hey, I need some help because I am not always right.” We should probably all say that more often.

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How Long Will it Take to Double Your Sales?

Doubling your sales is an ambitious goal for most business owners, but is this practical and if so, how long will it take?

It is not as difficult as it seems if you break it down into smaller components, such as the average percent increase that is needed each year to double your sales. Here are examples of how long it will take in years to double your sales based on your compounded growth rate percentage:

Growth Rate      Years to Double

5%                          14.2 Years

10%                        7.2 Years

15%                        5 Years

20%                        3.8 Years

25%                        3.1 Years

30%                        2.6 Years

40%                        2.1 Years

50%                        1.7 Years

 

Even a modest 15% growth rate will double your sales within 5 years, which is very reasonable. If you are able to keep your growth consistent for another 5 years, then you will double your sales again, which translates to a quadrupling of sales from your base. For example, a company with $1M in sales will double to $2M in 5 years and in another 5 years will double again to $4M.

Always do the math when figuring out how to achieve your sales goals to make sure you are on track.

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The One True Business Formula for Success

There are dozens of formulas and ratios that a business can use to determine success and profitability. However, there really is one that is most important and should be used repeatedly . . .

Sales – Expenses = Profit

Keep on repeating this formula over and over again and you will do just fine.

 

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Instead of Taking out More Debt, Do This Instead

One of the first ways most people try to cover a financial shortfall is to incur more debt. Whether this is to support a struggling business or even on a personal level. This may be a solution in some cases or may be used in conjunction with other financial methods. However, there is another solution that may work to solve your shortfall.

Reason for shortfall: Simply put, there will be a shortfall when your income is less than your expenses. Sometimes this is temporary or seasonal and you may be able to predict a shortfall based on business patterns.

The debt solution: Usually, most businesses turn to debt to smooth out the shortfalls. While this may be a viable solution, it should be well though-out and other options should be explored.

Alternative solutions: Aside from needing funds to support a large purchase, if your income is not enough to cover your expenses then instead of first choosing debt, here are a few other options:

Sales: Focus on increasing your sales. An increase in sales will help to increase your bottom line results. Will your expenses increase as a result? Most likely yes, but so should your profit. Aside from industries that have a poor cash conversion cycle, which is a topic all by itself, the additional business activity should help to offset your financial shortfalls.

Expenses: Small businesses should always be conscious of what they are spending their money on. Based on observation, small businesses do not usually spend their money excessively, but they may spend allocate it to areas of their business that do not generate a benefit, such as poorly spent advertising dollars.

Profitability by service/product/client: It may come as a surprise, but most likely there are several aspects of your business that are really not that profitable or may not be profitable at all. If that is the case, then by eliminating these activities your profits will increase as you can focus on increasing sales of higher profit services.

Don’t always go for the “easy” solution, but perhaps a simple, more sweat-producing, long-term solution to help the finances of your business.

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Increase Sales or Cut Expenses?

What should be the focus? Should we increase our sales or cut our expenses? All of the marketing and self-development gurus tend to focus on increasing our sales, but other financial experts want us to focus on cutting costs and debts. Who is right and what should we do? Let’s look at the pros and cons of each:

Cut your expenses and debt: Being aware of our expenses and cutting unnecessary expenses is a smart move, along with reducing debts. However, cutting expenses will only go so far because you need to incur expenses to support your business operations. Reducing debts is also a smart move, but this should not be done to the detriment of using up all of your cash, otherwise you will go right back to increasing your debts.

Increase your sales: Every business should look for ways to grow their sales, as a business tends to naturally deteriorate over time. An increase of sales can and should lead to an increase of profits, but not always. Many times, a business will increase sales activity, but their profits may actually decrease, stay flat, or only increase incrementally. The main reason for this is due to the fact that a business needs to spend money on marketing, people, technology, and infrastructure to be able to support higher sales.

The optimum solution: Instead of focusing on either or, you should focus on both to some degree, which is what the most successful companies do. Instead of just growing your sales haphazardly, you should focus on growing your sales profitably. To accomplish this you will need to perform some simple math to make sure that you are focusing on profitable services and products and delivering them in a profitable way as not every dollar of sales is equal. Better profitability will also allow a business to have excess cash to help pay down debts and not get into more debt. Without a focus on profitability, a fast growing company will tend to have cash flow issues, and companies that focus on cutting expenses tend to cut themselves into irrelevancy.

How Healthy Are Your Sales?

There are many ways of measuring risk, but did you know that your sales concentration may be placing an unnecessary risk to your business? This also applies to sales professionals as well.

I have seen it over and over again, whereas a small business relies heavily on one or several large customers, and then the customer disappears. Sometimes multiple large customers disappear at the same time. Either they go out of business, cut-back due to a slowdown, have management changes, or other various changes happen that are beyond their control. This will all impact your business as your sales now plummet.

As a good rule of thumb, you don’t want to have more than 10% of your sales from one customer. It creates more risk than necessary because you never know if or when things will change. There is an adage known as Murphy’s Law that states, “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” Additionally, you don’t want to rely heavily on one referral source for new business either. Murphy’s Law applies here as well.

What should you do to minimize your risk? First, never build your business around one or a few customers. This may be the case when a business is relatively new, but over time it is a huge risk. Secondly, assess sales per client to acknowledge who the large customers are. And thirdly, you need to market your business to decrease your risk of serving a few large customers.

A healthy business is constantly looking for ways to reduce risk. This not only decreases your chance of set-backs, but increases your odds of insuring ongoing success.