multiple businesses

How to Successfully Start a Second Business

Quite often entrepreneurs want to start a second business or even possibly a third, fourth and so on. What are the ways to make this successful, especially without selling or potentially harming your existing business(s), and what are some alternatives?

Similar or complementary business: Instead of say, an attorney, starting a restaurant, they may consider developing software to help other attorneys manage their practice better. Since they already have the experience of being a practicing attorney, they can transfer this knowledge into helping other attorneys and ideally use it in their own law practice.

Business with similar customers: Some businesses also serve your customers with a different product or service. To determine the other business that your customers use, observe which products or service providers your customers are also using and see if there is a pattern. Also, look to see who you are referring your customers to. For example, a landscaper may constantly refer their clients to a lawn sprinkler company, pest control business, or tree removal service.

Have a foundation in place: Make sure that you have a foundation in place for your existing business(s) so that they do not suffer as you develop other businesses. This usually takes years, but the main goal is to make your current business less dependent on you with everyday tasks. If your business suffers when you are not there for a few days then you are not ready.

Alternatives to starting another business:

Add a location: If you are successful in one location and have a good business model, then it is much easier to repeat this with another location. This can include second or third offices for a medical or professional practice, additional restaurants, and additional sales offices.

Purchase an existing business in the same industry: Having a strong foundation is important because you can easily absorb another business in the same industry as long as you have all of the infrastructure in place. This can include capital, space, employees, technology, and operating procedures.

Operate a business within your existing business: Instead of creating a distinctly separate business you can operate the additional business within your own business as a separate service offering or division. This can work well if the service offering is very similar to your existing business. Legal and tax implications should always be considered.

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