income

5 Risks to be Aware of that Will Hurt Your Finances

There are ups and downs in life, good times and bad, and everything in between. Unfortunately, some events can hurt your finances in a significant way and may even be beyond your control. What are some of these risks to be aware of and what can you control?

Health Issues

As we become older, there are more chances of having a serious health issue. What is not commonly thought of is that family members, such as spouses, elderly parents, and children can develop health issues, both physical and mental. We have a responsibility to take care of our family, and the time spent will take time away from our job or business, which will eventually lower our earnings. While you cannot control the health of others, you can take charge of your own health and that of your children by living a healthy lifestyle.

Addictions

Do not think that you are immune to addictions. Aside from alcohol, illegal drugs, and gambling addictions, there are other destructive addictions that will ruin your finances such as prescription drugs, video games, and pornography/sex. The statistics on who has these addictions, how they start, age groups, and the impact on your brain are alarming. Be aware of these addictions and do your best to stop them before they start.

Divorce

Aside from paying legal fees, there are statistics that show that divorced women experience a prolonged loss of earnings and lower standard of living after divorce, even though various studies show that approximately 70% of women initiate divorce. Surprisingly, statistics show that a man’s earnings increase significantly after divorce. Focus on a healthy marriage and your finances will be stronger, plus some studies show that divorce does not lead to a better life.

High Income then Low Income

Inconsistent income patterns can hurt your finances in multiple ways. The first is that if your income is very high in one year, then your spending will probably increase, and once your income drops, your spending will probably not drop as quickly, if at all. Second, if you have a very good year in your business and don’t set aside a reserve for taxes, then you won’t have the money to pay your tax bill, especially if your income is lower in the following year. I have seen this situation happen repeatedly.

Expense Creep

Expenses have a way of increasing faster than your income and are hard to lower once they do. A good rule is to increase your savings in the same proportion as your income, and do not incur additional debt. This way, it does not really matter what you spend, and yes, I really did say that, because mathematically it does not matter. It’s putting first things first.

 

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Hate Your Job, Make Less Money and Be Unhappy?

There is a recurring theme that I keep on hearing about love/hate relationships with jobs. It’s only anecdotal, but are job haters unhappy and make less money than  those with high job satisfaction? What are the possible reasons and what can you do about it?

Difference between a difficult job and hating your job

There are some jobs that are difficult, due to a lot pressure, working for management with poor people skills, and harsh working conditions. I’m not talking about a difficult job, but one that you hate so much that you dread waking up, driving to work, and virtually every second you are working.

Your drive may be less if you dread your job

When the drive to perform your job is diminished, most likely you will not push yourself to do a great job or go above and beyond. Ironically, if you put more effort into a job, even one that you hate, you may increase your satisfaction, while at a minimum bettering your job performance. Your bosses and management will eventually notice.

Dissatisfaction = lower income

When your drive is lower because you hate your job, it’s like a self-fulfilling prophecy, whereas your performance suffers and so does your pay. If you don’t give just a little bit extra of yourself, then others will notice. You may end up being a self-centered taker vs. a generous giver, which does not feel good.

Control your reactions and responses

The ultimate solution is to respond to your job situation versus being reactive to every negative whim you experience. Maybe it is not the job that is the issue, but your reactions to your job situation. Start responding in a healthy way and you will start to see how your work relationships change for the better. Better relationships = greater satisfaction.

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Wanna Be More Comfortable Financially?

Isn’t this what everyone says, that they want to be more comfortable financially? There are two ironies that are common with this thought, but you can do something about it.

Scenario #1

In this scenario you are making a good living, saving plenty, built up a good portfolio of assets, and have little to no debts. You should feel secure and comfortable, but yet you do not. Due to the fact that finances are very, very emotions based would be the reason for this, but I’ll let the psychologists figure out the exact reason. Whatever the reason may be, there may be two solutions to help change your perspective in this case: be thankful for your strong finances and be more generous with your giving. Remember, you can’t take it with you at the end, and there are others that can use some help right now.

Scenario #2

This is probably a more common scenario, but also relates to everything else in life. You need to make more money, save more, pay off your debts, and make your finances more secure and comfortable. Ironically, every action you take is in direct contradiction to obtaining healthier finances, from impulsive spending, failing to save, purchasing on credit, and a lack of serious actions to make more money. Maybe the reason is because you’re getting by, although not in a financially healthy manner, or maybe you feel like you are being restricted if you save a purchase for another day. Either way, it’s not working out well and you need to make changes. Even if the changes are very, very small changes, such as saving just 1% of your income, you will be surprised by how effective this can be to get the momentum going.

Last Thought

I’m not sure which scenario is better or which one is easier to fix. Would you rather think you are not financially comfortable, but really are, or not be comfortable, but prevent yourself from getting there?

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The Secret Formula for Financial Happiness

Is there really a secret formula for financial happiness? If so, it would look like this:

Income = $100

Spending = $90

Result = Financial happiness

Alternatively:

Income = $100

Spending = $110

Result = Not too happy financially (at least not for long)

Simple, but true.

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Use the Snowball Effect to Get Better Financial Results

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, a snowball effect is a situation in which something increases in size or importance at a faster and faster rate. It sounds too simple and general, but it is a useful principle that can be used to achieve significant results over time. Practical examples of this are as follows, along with how the opposite can also be true:

Savings/Investments: Do you find it hard to save or invest? Start with saving just the smallest amount possible and then build upon there. For example, if you start with a small percentage, such as 2% and increase it by 2% each year, then within 5 years you will be investing 10% of your income. If you are unable to save at all, then you need to either increase your income, decrease your expenses, or possibly do both.

Paying off debt: Want to pay off your personal and business debts quickly? Allocate a small percentage of your income towards paying off your balances, starting with the smallest balance first. Once you have paid off the smallest balance, then use those payments towards the next largest balance. If you start with the largest balance then you will lose the moment due to a lack of sense of achievement.

Increasing your income:  If you increase your income by 10% per year, then it will double in about 7 years and in approximately 5 years if you increase it by 15% per year. Even more modest increases can make an impact over time. Small actions, such as allocating a consistent amount of your time and resources to increase your business volume will add up significantly over time. For example, that one extra phone call (made or received), blog post, additional employee hired, etc. matters. For a multitude of tips, search prior blog posts.

Avoid this approach: Most people want instant results and because of this they either stop too soon or start too strong in an unsustainable manner. There is nothing wrong with strong approaches, but it must be sustainable over the long-term. All you have to do is apply this approach to weight loss and fitness and see how many of your friends and family start an exercise program and eat extremely healthy and then stop after a few months. It is hard to go from no exercise to spending an hour and a half 5 days a week exercising.

Over time your results will get better and better, but give it time to be productive. Think of your actions as planting a fruit tree, as it will take time to bear fruit.

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Beware of These 3 Conflicts Between Husbands and Wives When Both Work, Which Lead to Marital Tensions

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, approximately 61.1% of both parents work in families that have children under 18 years of age.  It seems to make economic sense to have both parents working nowadays, but it can create underlying tensions, which you should be aware of:

Independence vs. interdependence: Spouses are interdependent upon one another, but with both spouses working, this can create a lack of unity. Problems may arise by simply and innocently having separate checking accounts for each spouse. The problem is that this can create disunity and a lack of joint decisions regarding financial matters versus working together to make decisions jointly.

Income comparisons: When there is a large disparity of income, which there commonly is, one spouse may look down upon the other spouse as not contributing enough financially to the household. There may also ensue an unspoken, unhealthy competition between each spouse whereas they focus too much effort on who makes more money.

Importance comparisons: Everyone wants to believe that their job is more demanding, more stressful, and harder than others, whether this is real or perceived. Even so, comparisons to your spouse’s job are not going to make for a pleasant conversation at dinnertime.

There are many more, but they are just variations of the overall theme of comparisons and a lack of working together. Can you imagine what a comparison-free, working-together household would look like?

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