employees

The Lifeblood of Your Business

There is one critical aspect of your business that you cannot underestimate or take for granted. It’s not marketing or accounting, although these are important and critical also. It’s . . .

Your employees!

Customer service: Depending upon your role in your business, they probably have much more interaction with your customers than you do. Your employees should understand the importance of your customers and enjoy servicing them. Customer-focused employees will ensure a pleasant and successful experience for your customers.

Operations: Properly trained employees will be more productive and have better outcomes than poorly trained employees. Training can be on-site, off-site, or a combination of both, but is extremely important to the overall results of your business. Your customers will also have a much better experience when dealing with capable employees.

Team: Your employees are your team and to some extent like an extended family, especially if you factor in all of the time that you spend together. The business owner is the leader of the team and how well your team is lead will ultimately determine how well they perform. Leadership skills can be learned by experience, training, advisors/mentors, and education resources.

Treat ‘em well: Your employees are people too and need to be treated with respect and compassion. This does not mean that you should not correct them or be firm when necessary. Everyone needs this from time to time, even you. Make sure to compensate them as well as you are able to and provide room for career growth. Remember that people have ups and downs in life and sometimes it will be your employees who will pull you through those rough patches; other times you will be their rock.

Good employees will help your business to grow and prosper and they will grow along with it. Bad employees will provide a stumbling block and decrease your chance of success. Don’t neglect your team!

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Don’t Use Your Employees and Employees Don’t Use Your Employers

When I was a kid, sometimes a friend would say, “Don’t be friends with so and so because they are users.” I have to admit that I really did not know what that meant back then, but since I now have the Internet nowadays, I was able to look it up. According to urbandictionary.com, a user is someone who takes advantage of another’s kindness or generosity. They pretend to be a friend but are only in it for what they can get out of it. A user takes and takes, rarely gives. When it comes to employers and employees it can easily happen, but here are 4 ways to avoid using each other:

Be honest: When an employee takes a job there should be honesty on both ends. First, the employer should set expectations about the responsibilities, compensation, work environment, hours, advancement opportunities, etc. Employees should be honest with their employers about their experience, their ability to perform their job functions, their availability, and their own expectations. If you do not tell your employer that you plan on moving out of state in 6 months, especially after your employer has spent time and money on your training, then that is lying by omission. The same holds true for an employer that plans on moving their location in the near future without informing a new employee. Be upfront and honest.

Don’t dawdle or overload: A business makes money when employees are productive and loses money when they dawdle. Keep this in mind as an employee. Alternatively, if an employer overloads their employees then this can lead to burnout.

Give, don’t just take: Employees should not focus solely on their own paychecks, but on the overall success of the business. Think about what you can give to make your job better and for the business that you work for to succeed. Most likely, unless you work for a user, you will be compensated for high achievement. Employers should compensate their employees fairly and reward them when they are helping the business to be more profitable.

Do a good job: Do an excellent job and take pride in what you are doing whether you are an employee or an employer.

Don’t be a user!

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The Overlooked Business Asset

What is the most important asset of a business? Here are a few choices:

  1. Customers
  2. Employees
  3. Technology

They are all important, but there is one missing element. Relationships. Strong relationships are what make a business successful. It’s not a new concept and it’s been around since business started. Let’s look at each one:

Employees: Most employees do not just want a job, but a place that they enjoy working at. Strong relationships start with appreciation and gratitude for your employees and a team-based approach. When you have great relationships with your employees then productivity increases, loyalty forms, and customer service is improved.

Customers: Every business should strive for strong, lifetime relationships with their customers. However, this means that you should do business with people that you enjoy doing business with. As a byproduct, strong relationships foster win-win results, including an increase of business activity, loyalty, and referrals from friends and family.

Technology: Technology can help to foster relationships by keeping you more connected with your employees and customers and making their experience more enjoyable.

Based upon anecdotal evidence and especially the thoughts of business gurus, the concept of relationships seems to be very true. Also, what greatly impacts a business and is overlooked even more is the condition of our personal relationships. Look around and see for yourself.

One caveat. Do not form vain relationships with people just because of what they can do for you or from a view of utility, but rather as an act of charity.