Monthly Archives: May 2018

Low-Cost Memorial Day Weekend Ideas

If you haven’t already booked a trip for this weekend and are looking for some fun, low-cost ideas then here are a few tips:

Parades: Many towns have parades this weekend, and if you haven’t been to one in a while then it may bring back some memories from when you were a kid. I have to admit that when I go to a parade with the kids, I do get tempted to chase after the candy that’s thrown to us parade watchers.

Town Pools: If you don’t have a pool, then you may want to join your town pool. Divide the cost by the number of times you use the pool and it really is a bargain.

Spending Time with Family & Friends: Relax and spend some time with your loved ones. Either host a barbeque or attend one, but don’t forget to bring something.

Yard Work: It will make your spouse happy and you’ll feel good that you’re making your house look nicer.

Go to a Park: There are so many parks throughout North Jersey to choose from. One of my favorites is Van Saun County Park in Paramus, which has picnic areas, train rides, a zoo, carousel, playgrounds, fishing, etc.

Go to a Farm: It may be a little early to pick berries or veggies, but many farms offer freshly baked items, dairy products, greenhouse veggies, and very nice scenery.

Whatever you do, make sure to remember that Memorial Day is a day to celebrate and honor those who died while serving in the armed forces.

Don’t Make These Easily Avoided Financial Mistakes

We are all not perfect and everyone makes mistakes. However, the key is to avoid these financial mistakes as much as possible:

Penny wise and dollar dumb: The actual expression is penny wise and pound foolish, but I still remember a partner from my first job saying this to a client (maybe it’s the American version). I guess it doesn’t matter how you say it as long as you make your point. The message is to not be cheap so that you save a few dollars, but it ends up costing you a lot more down the road. This can happen with almost any financial transaction so always be aware of what you are trying to accomplish.

Ignoring tax notices: Don’t be surprised to find out that your bank account has been levied or there are liens against your assets if you don’t address tax notices. Surprisingly, the notice may actually be wrong, but the IRS or states do not know this. If you do not resolve the notice timely, then penalties, interest, and collection costs may be added to your balance or you may not receive your refund.

Not filing your returns: Sometimes taxpayers hesitate to file their tax returns when they know that they owe money, but do not have the ability to pay their balance. Fortunately, there are usually payment arrangements that can be made in these cases. Also, every now and then I come across a situation where there is actually a refund due to a client, but they took too long to file their returns so they are not longer eligible to receive it. Now that’s painful!

Not saving anything: Just about everyone can save at least 1% of their income to make this a habit, and then can increase their savings rate over time. The earlier you start, the better and don’t convince yourself otherwise.

Too much long-term savings/illiquid assets: Sometimes the opposite is true when people tie up all of their money in their retirement plans or real estate, but do not accumulate short-term savings. What tends to happen is that retirement savings are tapped if there is a financial emergency or long-term financial set-back, which in turns ends up creating a tax issue.

Increase Sales or Cut Expenses?

What should be the focus? Should we increase our sales or cut our expenses? All of the marketing and self-development gurus tend to focus on increasing our sales, but other financial experts want us to focus on cutting costs and debts. Who is right and what should we do? Let’s look at the pros and cons of each:

Cut your expenses and debt: Being aware of our expenses and cutting unnecessary expenses is a smart move, along with reducing debts. However, cutting expenses will only go so far because you need to incur expenses to support your business operations. Reducing debts is also a smart move, but this should not be done to the detriment of using up all of your cash, otherwise you will go right back to increasing your debts.

Increase your sales: Every business should look for ways to grow their sales, as a business tends to naturally deteriorate over time. An increase of sales can and should lead to an increase of profits, but not always. Many times, a business will increase sales activity, but their profits may actually decrease, stay flat, or only increase incrementally. The main reason for this is due to the fact that a business needs to spend money on marketing, people, technology, and infrastructure to be able to support higher sales.

The optimum solution: Instead of focusing on either or, you should focus on both to some degree, which is what the most successful companies do. Instead of just growing your sales haphazardly, you should focus on growing your sales profitably. To accomplish this you will need to perform some simple math to make sure that you are focusing on profitable services and products and delivering them in a profitable way as not every dollar of sales is equal. Better profitability will also allow a business to have excess cash to help pay down debts and not get into more debt. Without a focus on profitability, a fast growing company will tend to have cash flow issues, and companies that focus on cutting expenses tend to cut themselves into irrelevancy.

9 Ways to Reduce Your Money Worries

When we lack money it creates a lot of stress and anxiety, and can be a source of tension in relationships. But how can we make our money work for us? Here are several ways we can take more control of our money to reduce our stresses:

  1. Change your thoughts: Reframe the way you think about money from being worried about it to being non-emotional about it. Nothing changes if you are worried about it, but worries may cause you to make worse financial decisions. This doesn’t mean that you should not care about money or be reckless.
  2. Be a good steward: If you think of your money not as your own, then you will manage it differently. It is a resource, no matter how great or how small, that we are given to be responsible with. Don’t be foolish with how you spend your money or the way you invest it.
  3. Save it first: Save your money first before you pay anyone else. Even if you start with saving 1 % of your income, it will create a habit that will last you a lifetime, and over time you can increase the percentage to more meaningful amounts. Although 1% may only amount to $20, $50 or so a week so there is almost no excuse to save this small amount, even if you are struggling. I like percentages because you save more when your income is higher and less when it is lower.
  4. Delay large purchases: Houses and cars are our largest expenses, but usually there is not a lot of thought put into these purchases. More time should be spent discerning larger purchases then small ones.
  5. Minimize useless debts: It seems as though anything can be financed today, from cell phones to plastic surgery. If your cell phone bill is $500 a month because you financed 5 iphones then you probably couldn’t afford the phones in the first place.
  6. Make more money: If your income is not high enough and your spending is not an issue, then figure out ways to make more money. If you need to switch jobs or hire a consultant for your business then do it.
  7. Give it away: I’m not sure if there are studies on this, but anecdotally, people who are more charitable seem to be happier than those who are not.
  8. Be timely: Pay your bills in a timely manner by being more systematic. Late fees and threatening notices are never enjoyable.
  9. Do something different: As with any problem, you need to change what you are doing because obviously it is not working. Yes, we are all stubborn.

By the way, it doesn’t matter if you make $50,000, $500,000 or $5,000,000, as you will have the same issues, with different variations. And, more money doesn’t mean fewer problems.